New Coastguard film aims to highlight dangers of cold water

A new film which targets 18 to 29 year old men with a message about the dangers of cold water shock is being launched by the Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA) today (Monday 25 July). The new 40-second film aims to highlight the dangers of jumping or falling into water, especially after drinking, and reveals…

via New film aims to highlight dangers of drinking or falling into water, especially after drinking — Maritime and Coastguard Agency

Water safety group’s call to action to reduce drowning

A national drowning prevention strategy that aims to halve the number of fatal incidents on or near water will be launched on 29 February by Transport Minister Robert Goodwill MP.

The document, created by members of the National Water Safety Forum* (NWSF) is the UK’s first drowning prevention strategy, created in response to the World Health Organization’s report on global drowning, which recommended that every nation should have a drowning prevention strategy.

About 400 people drown and a further 200 take their own lives in our waters in the UK every year; that equates to one accidental drowning every 20 hours. Activities in and around water are safer now than ever, but 44% of drowning fatalities happen to people who had no intention of entering the water.

The UK strategy highlights the areas that organisations need to focus on to make a difference and asks for support in contributing towards the national plan. The NWSF strategy page can be viewed here: http://www.nationalwatersafety.org.uk/strategy/

The NWSF will be asking organisations and individuals to sign up to a pledge to reduce drownings; to contribute towards the shared objective by making the National Strategy a local priority and by actively supporting the intention of the Strategy by raising the profile of drowning in the UK.

Robert Goodwill said:

“The number of people drowning each year is shocking and must be cut. As an island nation the water plays an integral part of our lives. But the sea, rivers, lakes and canals are all too frequently killers and action needs to be taken.

“That is why I fully support the launch of this drowning prevention strategy. Working together we can significantly reduce the number of tragic deaths and prevent the families of hundreds of people each year going through unbearable pain and suffering.”

George Rawlinson, Chair of the National Water Safety Forum commented:

‘Hardly a day goes past without some sort of human tragedy taking place in UK waters. Around four-hundred people accidentally drown each year in the UK – this is unacceptable and it’s a problem that we need to face up to together.

‘The organisations represented through the National Water Safety Forum have united in a common aim – to prevent history repeating itself in this tragic way, year after year, and to use our resources in the most effective way to halve accidental drowning fatalities in the UK by 2026.  It’s an ambitious target but well worth striving for. Now we have a strategy, we have a focus and, most importantly, a call to action to do more to combat drowning. Ultimately, we hope to save every life – one life lost is one too many.’

NWSF News & Updates

Boating & Watersports Participation Surges to Highest Level Since 2007
Participation rates in core boating and watersports activities surged in 2013 according to research released by by BMF, MCA, RNLI, RYA, BCU and MMO.
A total of 3.5 million adults (7.1% of the population) took to the water across a number of activities including power boating, sailing, canal boating and rowing/skulling.
This reflects an increase of 23% in the number of participants from 2012 when 2.8 million adults, took part in at least one of the activities. Within this total, canoeing and kayaking in particular proved popular, recording an all-time high of 1.5 million adults (3% of the population). Read more: http://www.britishmarine.co.uk/news__press/press_article.aspx?ArticleId=4282
Water sport safety information from the NWSF: http://www.nationalwatersafety.org.uk/professional/advice.asp

Neknominate ‘game’ leads to a false emergency call
After receiving reports from that a teenager was threatening to jump into the rough seas, Humber Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre sent the Redcar RNLI Lifeboat to Saltburn Pier. When the teams on scene couldn’t find the teenager further investigations revealed that he was at home. He had posted his intention to jump from the Pier on social media. Humber Coastguard Watch Manager Bev Allen said;
“If you have been drinking, your judgement will be impaired and you will be more likely to be overcome by the cold, dark sea. Your acceptance of the dare is highly likely to be life threatening. Alcohol is a contributory factor in a significant number of coastal drownings every year. Alcohol and sea water really don’t mix” http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/newsandpublications/press-releases.htm?id=96B5848B506AE7DC&m=2&y=2014

National Watersports Month
The British Marine Federation (BMF) and strategic partners the Royal Yachting Association (RYA), British Canoe Union (BCU) and British Rowing are working together on a new initiative, to encourage the nation to get on the water this coming May.
National Watersports Month will focus on promoting events across the country providing a variety of boating and watersports activities. Sailing, windsurfing, rowing, canoeing, kayaking, inland waterway cruising events and more will be taking place – to find out more and to get involved visit: http://www.watersportsmonth.co.uk
Water sport safety information from the NWSF: http://www.nationalwatersafety.org.uk/professional/advice.asp

MAIB Safety Bulletin 1/2014 – Eshcol
Carbon monoxide poisoning on board the scallop-dredger Eshcol in Whitby, North Yorkshire resulting in two fatalities. Read the report: http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/Safety%20Bulletin%201_2014.pdf

MAIB Safety Bulletin 2/2014 – ECC Topaz
MAIB Safety Bulletin on the fire and subsequent foundering of workboat ECC Topaz 11nm east of Lowestoft on 14 January 2014, was published on 26 February 2014. http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/Safety%20Bulletin%202_2014.pdf

Accident Investigation Report 6/2014: Sirena Seaways
MAIB Report on the investigation of Sirena Seaways’s heavy contact with the berth at Harwich International Port on 22 June 2013. Download report: http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/SirenaSeaways.pdf

Accident Investigation Report 7/2014 Prospect
MAIB Report on the investigation of the fv Prospect grounding on Skibby Baas and foundering in the North entrance to Lerwick Harbour, Shetlands Islands.Read more: http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/Prospect.pdf

Accident Investigation Report 8/2014 Danio
MAIB’s investigation into the grounding of the general cargo vessel Danio in the Farne Islands nature reserve, off the east coast of England. Read more: http://www.maib.gov.uk/cms_resources.cfm?file=/Danio.pdf

NWSF NEWS & Updates

‘Turn around, don’t drown’
More than half (54%) of UK drivers would endanger themselves and their vehicles by driving through moving flood water; according to a joint Environment Agency and AA survey. The research also revealed that more than a quarter (27%) of respondents would drive through moving flood water deeper than 30cm, (which is enough to move a car). The EA and the AA strongly advise not entering flood water that is moving or water more than 10cm deep.
Last year, the second wettest on record in the UK, claimed the lives of several motorists. In the same period, the AA rescued almost 9,000 vehicles that had driven through or were stuck in flood water, with an estimated insurance bill of more than £34 million. The survey found that:

  • more than two-fifths (42%) of drivers would blindly follow the vehicle in front if it had crossed a flooded road successfully;
  • the equivalent of 680,000 drivers would ignore a ‘road closed’ warning sign and drive down a flooded road rather than take a short detour – this is dangerous, an offence and insurers could reject any flood damage claim;
  • people aged between 55 and 64 are most likely to risk driving through the deepest flowing flood water (up to 34cm);
    men would attempt to drive through deeper water (up to 34cm) than women (up to 27cm):
  • and those living in North East England would attempt to drive through deeper water (up to 34cm) than anywhere else in the UK.

‘Tragically people die because they’ve taken risks and attempted to drive through flood water. Flood water is dangerous, dirty and it can carry disease. If there is widespread flooding in your area then don’t travel and if a road is closed then turn around and make a detour. It is tempting to think you’re safe from the dangers of floodwater in some big vehicles like 4x4s and vans, but the fact is, that you aren’t’ said Adele Needham for the Environment Agency. The EA in the South West has been trialing hi-tech signs at three blackspots in the West Country, where drivers have previously been rescued after becoming trapped by floodwater. The lights were introduced as part of a ‘Think Don’t Sink’ campaign that aims to raise awareness of the dangers of flooded roads. The lights, that are similar in size to standard speed limit signs, are linked by telemetry to nearby watercourses and immediately start flashing when water levels reach the point where a road has flooded. The word ‘Flood’ is clearly visible to approaching drivers. Signs are positioned either side of a flooding blackspot at the point where motorists can chose an alternative route and avoid being trapped in their vehicle. Often they are in Rapid Response Catchments where conditions can change quickly following heavy rain and water levels rise with little warning. To find out if you are at risk and to sign up for free flood warnings go to:
http://www.environment-agency.gov.uk/homeandleisure/floods/default.aspx or call Floodline on 0845 988 1188.

Coastal safety and Coastguard safety messages

The Coastguard remind dog owners not to put themselves in danger
Humber Coastguard is again urging dog owners not to put themselves at risk by trying to save their pet. The warning comes after the rescue of a pitbull terrier that jumped into the water at Seaham Pier, County Durham. Graham Dawson, Watch Manager at Humber Coastguard, said:
“The owner was worried about her pet and told emergency services that she was going to enter the water to try to rescue her dog. This is something we strongly advise against, as you are likely to get into difficulty yourself. We find that most dogs manage to get themselves back to shore safe and well, but some owners do not. We’d also encourage owners to keep their pets on a lead. But if they do enter the water or fall down a cliff edge, please call 999 straight away and ask for the Coastguard.” Read more: http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/newsandpublications/press-releases.htm?id=B3C4D8D51D7608DE&m=12&y=2013

A joint appeal from the Police and Coastguard: ‘Do not enter the sea during bad weather’.
Devon and Cornwall Police with Her Majesty’s Coastguard are appealing to local residents and visitors to the Devon and Cornwall region not to enter the sea during the bad weather. A police spokesperson said: “There are people who enjoy swimming in all weathers as well as those who may underestimate the danger a rough sea can pose. During the current bad weather, we would like to appeal to people not to put themselves, and emergency personnel who might have to turn out to rescue them, in unnecessary danger.”
HM Coastguard advises that those who enjoy walking on beaches and rocky areas stay away from the surf line during this period of extreme weather and ensure that children and pets do likewise. Large waves can easily take people by surprise and the force of the waves is significant. Dogs should be kept on leads if walking along cliff tops.
In an emergency at the coast, do not put yourself in danger by entering the water or climbing cliffs but call 999 and request the Coastguard. http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/newsandpublications/press-releases.htm?id=B3C4D8D51D7608DE&m=12&y=2013

Huber Coastguard urge anglers to name their fishing gear
After having coordinated a search for an angler who left valuable fishing gear unattended on a jetty at Ness Point, Lowestoft, the Coastguard urge anglers to name their fishing gear. The search involved four lifeboats, one Police helicopter and a Coastguard Rescue Team. The angler concerned had gone home to collect his medication and then got held up. Graham Dawson, Humber Coastguard watch manager says:
“We take all reports of possible missing persons at sea very seriously, with the recent bad weather and floods we have been extremely busy and if this angler had clearly named his fishing equipment we could have contacted him and saved the time and effort of the resources involved in today’s search effort.”
http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/newsandpublications/press-releases.htm?id=B6F7449E1E8B3FEC&m=1&y=2014

News & Updates November ’13

The BSAC Diving Incident Report 2013 has been released

The Annual Diving Incident Report for 2013 is now available to download from the BSAC website. Published by BSAC every year, the 2013 report recorded a total of 263 incidents throughout the UK.
The number of incidents reported this year is about 29% lower than the level of recent years and it follows the trend noted in 2012. This reduction is due to a lower number of incidents reported in the period March to June. It is believed that this was caused by the very poor weather conditions in the UK during this period resulting in a reduced amount of diving taking place. Other highlighted conclusions from the latest report include:

  • The number of fatalities of BSAC members is slightly below the average of the previous 10 years.
  • The number of fatalities of non-BSAC members is in line with the average of the previous 10 years.
  • The causal factors associated with these fatalities and other incidents are very similar to those seen over a number of years; no new causal factors have been identified.
  • Diver age and related health and fitness issues are still featuring as critical factors in this and recent years’ fatalities. The average age of the subjects of this year’s diving fatalities was 52.2. The average age of the background diving population in 2013 is 42.5.
  • Incidents of DCI continue to fall.
  • Ascent related incidents continue to reduce.
  • Incidents relating to ‘Boating & Surface’ events have dropped back to earlier levels.

The above conclusions need to be viewed in the light of a probable overall reduction in the amount of UK diving that has taken place in this period. However, as has been stated many times before, most of the incidents reported within this document could have been avoided had those involved followed a few basic principles of safe diving practice. BSAC publishes a booklet called ‘Safe Diving’ (new edition imminent) which summarises all the key elements of safe diving and is available to all, free of charge, from the http://www.bsac.com/page.asp?section=1019

Help us to keep diving safe – If you have been involved in or witnessed an incident, please report it – in confidence – and help us to continue to shape a safe future for diving. Whether you are BSAC or another agency, a recreational or technical diver or if the incident happened in the UK or overseas, we want to hear about it. All reports are treated in confidence and any details used in future reports will be anonymous.
You can report incidents at any time online.

RNLI scheme helps sea anglers stay safe

A new pilot scheme created by the RNLI is aiming to help keep sea anglers safe while they enjoy their sport. Last year 11 sea anglers tragically lost their lives while fishing in the UK* and the RNLI responded to over 1,200 incidents involving anglers. The RNLI is working with bait and tackle shops to pilot a Retail Ambassador Scheme, in which the charity helps the shops give their customers safety advice.
Chris Adams, RNLI Coastal Safety Manager, said:

‘It is not about preventing people fishing from rocks or exposed shorelines, but helping them take the right steps to enjoy their sport safely. ’

There are some simple things that anglers can do to keep themselves safe:

–          wear a lifejacket

–          Check the weather and tides before you head out

–          Tell someone where you’re going and when you expect to be back

–          Carry a means of calling for help

–          If you’re fishing from a boat, keep it well maintained.

*Statistics taken from the National Water Safety Forum’s Water Incident Database (WAID).Download Tackle shops help the RNLI keep anglers safe

England’s bathing waters see record improvement

New figures show that almost 99 per cent of England’s bathing waters meet strict quality standards. Water quality around England’s coasts has dramatically improved since last year, new figures from Defra have revealed today. Nearly all of England’s bathing waters have met strict quality standards, with almost 99 per cent of England’s bathing waters meeting the minimum European water quality standard, and over 82 per cent, the highest ever number of bathing waters – meeting the tighter guideline standard. Environment Minister, Dan Rogerson said: “England’s bathing waters have seen record improvements, meeting the highest standard this year and we need to make sure they continue to remain of good quality. Having quality bathing water and beaches is not only good for the environment but also boosts tourism and creates a stronger local economy. From 2015 the water quality at Britain’s beaches will be measured against stricter levels. The revised EU Bathing Water Directive sets much higher water quality standards which are approximately twice as stringent as the current standards”.

Lord Chris Smith, Chairman of the Environment Agency, said: “The improvement in the quality of UK bathing waters this year is really good news, but with much stricter standards coming into force in 2015, we cannot afford to be complacent. The Environment Agency is working hard with local authorities, businesses and water companies to ensure that bathing waters meet the new standards, and the seaside tourist economy in England continues to thrive”.

Bathing water results for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are published by the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Department of Environment Northern Ireland respectively. For more information on the Improving water quality policy go to: https://www.gov.uk/government/policies/improving-water-quality

Bathing waters in England: 2013 compliance report

New Report Assesses Inland Accidental Drowning Risk

The new report from RoSPA based on WAID data has identified a number of clear risk factors, enabling a more coordinated, effective and targeted approach to drowning prevention strategies.

The report ‘Assessing Inland Accidental Drowning Risk’ was funded by the RoSPA/ BNFL Scholarship scheme, and is the first report to conduct an in-depth analysis of the WAID dataset. A finding of note include a disproportionate (50% higher) rate of drowning among Welsh and Scottish males, when compared to English counterparts.

Other findings of note were:

More water + more people = more incidents. The rate of accidental inland drowning varies greatly between areas depending on the amount of water and the number of people in that area.

Leisure Safety_Summer 2013_inland risks report pic 2

The predominant hazard is “open water”, such as rivers, lakes and canals, in which 81 per cent of the deaths that were analysed, occurred. There is a stark difference with indoor swimming pools; in which just 2.7 per cent of deaths occurred.

Higher risk for Scottish and Welsh men: The rate of drowning is far higher in Scotland & Wales. The rate of death for males is over double that of females, for all three countries. Males in general have higher rates of drowning than females, particularly teenagers and young men.

Activity based risk: Whilst the risk of death is not assessed to be intolerable for any individual sport, the rate of death does vary greatly between sports. However the majority of deaths (68 per cent) involved “day-to-day” activities such as walking by water.

The project was developed in conjunction with a Forum working group including inland, and the watersports members. This report is the first in series of risk analysis developed by Forum members, and these along with the developement of a national drowning prevention strategy will be presented at the UK water safety conference in October.

More information on the WAID system can be found here.

The ‘Assessing Inland Accidental Drowning Risk Short Report ‘ can be viewed here.

Consultation: Draft Open Water Swimming advice from the National Water Safety Forum

Consultation: Draft Open Water Swimming advice from the National Water Safety Forum

Analysis based on the NWSF Water Incident Database (WAID) accident data from 2009-11; shows an average of 19 fatalities per year at inland-open-water sites (lakes, rivers, pools, quarries, canals) occurred in circumstances that could be attributed to open water swimming. The risks of in-water death is approximately 1:200,000 participants per year; similar to that of a pedestrian being struck by a motor vehicle[i].

This document has been developed by members of the watersports and inland advisory groups. It is intended to cover key points for members of the public, who wish to swim in open water.

The base information (10 points) will be used as a framework by members in response to queries. The final version will sit on the NWSF website, with links to further information and advice from members and stakeholders.
There are a number of specific elements we would like your view on:
– Have we missed any critical safety points?
– Is the length and tone correct?
– Have we used too much by way of technical language?
– Is it easy to read?
– What extra background or wider information should we cite and direct people to?
Please include if your response is on behalf of a group or organisation, or as an individual.

We would like your views on the above and other points you wish to raise, by Friday 26th July. You can respond to: info@nationalwatersafety.org.uk

Draft for comment, July 13
Open water swimming advice
Introduction

Variously termed ‘wild’ and open water swimming, this activity is not new but is enjoying something of a revival in the UK. Open water can be used to describe, rivers, lakes, pools and the sea. Any recreational use of water should be encouraged but equally it is important to enjoy the activity safely.

Analysis based on NWSF-WAID accident data (2009-11) shows an average of 19 fatalities per year at inland-open-water sites (lakes, rivers ect) occurred in circumstances that could be attributed to open water swimming. The risks of in-water death is approximately 1:200,000 participants per year, similar to that of a pedestrian being struck by a motor vehicle[i].

These guidelines are intended to provide simple common sense points to help you enjoy safer swimming in open water. However, it should be recognised that there are significant differences between a swimming pool and open water swimming and swimmers are recommended to seek an introduction with an experienced leader to develop awareness, competency and confidence in open water.

Our top A-B-C tips for safe open water swimming:

Activity
1. If you want to drink alcohol do it after swimming not before
2. Go with a group – you’ll have help on hand
3. Swim in known locations and before entering the water make sure there is a safe exit point
• Check out local knowledge and advice (speak to clubs)
• Look out for and follow any safety signage
• Avoid weirs, locks and other structures
• Swim parallel to the shore not into deep water and within your personal limits
• Avoid swimming in polluted waters (e.g. sewage, blue/green algae, farm runoff).
Buoyancy
1. Cold water can sap body heat very quickly so wear suitable thermal protection (a wetsuit will also provide some additional buoyancy)
2. Only swim if you are confident in your ability in the water and wear additional buoyancy if you are not a strong swimmer. Other clothing to consider
• Footwear for protection and grip when entering and exiting the water
• Googles, to protect eyes but also allow you to see underwater for obstructions etc.
• Headwear, especially a high visibility swim cap in areas with lots of surface traffic.
Conditions
1. When entering the water be aware of the effects of cold shock and ensure you acclimatise before swimming in deeper water
2. Limit exposure (20 mins or start to shiver) and take account of surface conditions
3. Keep warm before swimming and have the means to warm up immediately after a swim
4. Know how to cope with cramp (stay shallow so you can stand up or use extra buoyancy)
5. Make sure you have the means of alerting the emergency services

________________________________________
[i] http://www.rospa.com/leisuresafety/Info/Watersafety/inland-waters-risk-assessment.pdf

Why should I wear a Lifejacket or Buoyancy Aid when i’m angling?

The lives of at least nine anglers may have been saved in 2012; had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. Of the nine anlgers that died; seven were shore-based.

Fishing from the rocks

In 2012, five of the seven shore anglers who might have been saved had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid – were fishing from rocks. Over the last six years, at least 41 might have been saved if they had worn some form of buoyancy device. Most anglers recognise the importance of wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid when they are onboard a small boat. But do you wear one when you’re fishing from rocks?

Unexpected large waves can wash you off rock marks. Be aware and prepare, by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

Who has compiled these statistics?
These figures have been compiled by an expert panel review comprising: Angling Trust, RNLI, Royal Yachting Association, Marine Accident Investigation Branch, Maritime and Coastguard Agency, National Water Safety Forum, British Canoe Union, the lifejacket industry, Scottish Fishermen’s Federation and University of Portsmouth.

The panel uses data supplied from Coastguard and MAIB databases and therefore only covers coastal incidents. Other inland fatal angling incidents, where a lifejacket might have saved a life may have occurred during 2012, but these are not included for this exercise.

In March 2013 the panel reviewed the Coastguard/MAIB data and assessed whether a lifejacket or buoyancy aid would have made a difference in saving a person’s life. A decision was made about whether it was probable, possible or unlikely that the person would have been saved by wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. The panel also took into consideration factors such as whether the lifejacket or buoyancy aid was suitably maintained, correctly worn and fit for purpose. In some cases it was not appropriate for the person to be wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid, for example swimmers.

Figures for all activities
The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) recorded 132 maritime fatalities in 2012. The expert panel reviewed 45 of these where the casualty might have worn a lifejacket or buoyancy aid (so cliff fallers, suicides and so on were not included).

Of the 45 fatalities, the panel judged that it may have been appropriate for 27 people to have been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. Of these 27, the panel agreed that 20 would probably or could possibly have been saved had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.

Figures have been compiled by the panel for the last six years and during that period the panel judged that 136 people’s lives might have been saved had they been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.
Read the full blog at: http://hmcoastguard.blogspot.co.uk/
Read Personal Buoyancy Afloat: http://www.nationalwatersafety.org.uk/professional/bouyancyafloat.asp

NWSF News & Updates June ’13

HRH The Duke of Cambrige, calls for school swimming to be accessible for all children
His Royal Highness, The Duke of Cambridge and patron of the English Schools Swimming Association, has recorded a short video calling for school swimming to be accessible for all children at all primary schools.
The video has been released following the largest ever investigation into school swimming by the ASA that revealed more than half of children aged 7-11 years cannot swim 25 metres unaided. This equates to 1.1 million children that are unable to be safe in and around water

“The ASA has a belief – a vision, which I share – that every child has the right to learn to swim” – His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge.
In the video he goes onto say: “Swimming is unique – it is the only sport that can save lives – which is why I’m so keen for school swimming to be accessible for all children at all primary schools. The ability to swim changes lives – it brings huge joy and it can keep us fit and healthy. But above all, it can keep us safe, which is why I’m pleased to lend my support to this campaign.”

The ASA, for their report entitled “Learning the Lesson – the future of school swimming”, surveyed 3,501 schools on how many of their children have attained Key Stage 2 swimming requirements. It found that half of children aged seven to eleven cannot swim the length of a typical swimming pool (25 metres) unaided, despite swimming being a compulsory element of the national curriculum.

David Sparkes, Chief Executive of the ASA said “The ASA’s vision is that that every child should have the right and opportunity to learn to swim to help achieve a fitter, healthier and perhaps above all a safer generation of young people. I am delighted that His Royal Highness The Duke of Cambridge supports this vision and has provided support to our campaign.
“I am in no doubt that this support will help drive awareness around the importance of swimming, a life saving skill, being accessible to every child in primary school.”
Download a copy of the ASA Learning the Lesson: The Future of School Swimming 2013 Census: 2013 School Swimming Census
This report is about a belief – a vision – that every child has the right and opportunity to learn to swim to help achieve a fitter, healthier and perhaps above all a safer generation of young people. It is about mapping – on an unprecedented scale – the reality of school swimming in 2013 and using that insight to learn lessons and help to safeguard its future.
Read the full article: http://www.swimming.org/asa/news/school-swimming/hrh-the-duke-of-cambridge-records-video-message-outlining-importance-of-tea/17289/
Watch the full video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gs7kBpGm8GM&feature=youtu.be

Fishing vessel firm showed “blatant disregard for safety”
A fishing vessel company and its two directors have been ordered to pay nearly £150,000 in fines and costs after pleading guilty to several breaches of maritime safety regulations. TN Trawlers Ltd and directors, Thomas Iain Nicholson and Christopher John Nicholson, were prosecuted after a number of defects were found on vessels owned by the firm.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) inspected the Olivia Jean in the port of Shoreham in November 2009 and detained the vessel due to a number of defects, including an out of date Intermediate Survey and Radio Survey. In addition, no crew qualifications or safety training details were available. After being released, the vessel travelled to the Netherlands for a refit and survey but in January 2010, it was again inspected by the MCA and further defects were identified, including unauthorised additions and modifications to the vessel. According to the MCA, there were also concerns about the condition of other parts of the vessel where maintenance was described as “very poor”.

An investigation by the MCA Enforcement Unit was launched, which highlighted other problems, including the vessel carrying more deck cargo than permitted in its stability information. In November 2009 the Philomena and Georgelou N were observed by the Channel Navigation Information Service failing to cross the south west lane of the Dover Straits Traffic Separation Scheme at right angles, contrary to regulations designed to avoid collisions. The Philomena was later inspected by the MCA and 27 defects were discovered leading to the vessel being detained.

The Georgelou N was inspected after becoming grounded in the River Mersey following mechanical failure in April 2011. The MCA identified problems with crew certification and numbers onboard being more than permitted by the amount of safety equipment. A further inspection in July 2011 highlighted problems with crew certification, safety training and the Intermediate Survey for the vessels safety certificate was overdue. The vessel Tobrach N was also detained after the MCA found that it had been to sea despite its safety certificate having expired two months previously. The company and directors were ordered to pay a total of £147,465 in fines and costs. His Honour Judge Ralls QC said: “The numbers of injuries and deaths at sea are concerning”.

The likelihood of death is greater than in the agricultural or construction industry. Fishing vessels operate in a harsh and uncompromising environment. Great care needs to be taken in that vessels are in a safe condition at all times.
“It is the owner’s responsibility to those that they employ.” Captain Jeremy Smart, Head of Enforcement for the MCA, said: “TN Trawlers and its directors failed to heed previous warnings and advice from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA). The standard of care was far below what is expected, and the failings could have led to loss of life or serious injury. “This blatant disregard for safety standards is one of the worst that the MCA has come across in past years and we are pleased that this view has been supported by the sentence of the court. “The fishing industry is well known for its high levels of risk and dangers. Accordingly proper attention to health and safety matters is of the very highest importance in the industry and a few poorly managed vessels can give the industry a bad name. “We will not tolerate this behaviour where financial gain seems to be more important than the value of human life.”
Taken from: The RoSPA Occupational Safety & Health journal.

Fishing safety resource
A new website offering information to fishermen on the location of subsea cables and renewable energy structures has been launched.

The Kingfisher Information Service – Offshore Renewable and Cable Awareness project (KIS-ORCA) is a joint initiative between Subsea Cables UK and Renewable UK and is being managed by the Kingfisher Information Service of the Sea Fish Industry Authority (Seafish), which is a non-departmental public body whose mission is to support the seafood industry to work for a sustainable, profitable future. The KIS-ORCA website aims to offer free, accurate, up-to-date information to fishermen on the location of cables and renewable structures such as wind farms. As well as being available online, the positional information will also be supplied to fishermen on CD in a format compatible with their on-board fishing plotter systems by the Scottish Fishermen’s Federation and the National Federation of Fishermen’s Organisations.

In addition to an interactive map, the website includes information on subsea cables, renewable energy, links to operators and safety advice on reducing the risks of fishing near cables and renewable energy structures, with emergency contact numbers. A range of awareness charts are also available to download. Matt Frow, manager of Kingfisher, said: “We recognise the concerns of the fishing industry around expanding offshore operations. We believe http://www.kis-orca.eu and the associated charts and plotter data, will provide fishermen with essential information to remain safe whilst undertaking their fishing activities. We will continue to work closely with all offshore industries to develop and improve the information that we provide to the fishing industry.”
Access the website at: http://www.kis-orca.eu.

Cross-party group calls for action to tackle school swimming
A cross-party group of MPs and peers is calling for the Government to tackle the concerning numbers of children unable to swim. The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Sport, chaired by Gerry Sutcliffe MP (and supported by umbrella body the Sport and Recreation Alliance), met in Parliament today to highlight the issue.
Group members including Baroness Grey-Thompson, Ian Austin MP, Andrew Bingham MP and Charlotte Leslie MP were present to show their support. It was an opportunity for David Sparkes, chief executive of the Amateur Swimming Association (ASA), to present the findings of its biggest ever investigation into school swimming. Figures show that more than half (51%) of children aged 7 to 11 years cannot swim 25 metres unaided, despite the fact that swimming is a national curriculum requirement. Almost 45% of schools stated that the biggest barrier to delivering better quality school swimming was budget constraints. Where schools are achieving high attainment rates amongst their pupils it is attributed to better pupil to teacher ratios, longer lesson times and a higher number of lessons offered.
David Sparkes, chief executive of the ASA said: “Many young children engage in organised sport for the first time at school – and this is also when many will make their first visit to a swimming pool. Without school swimming we know that many children would not have the opportunity to learn this life-saving skill, or take part in one of the easiest and enjoyable forms of physical activity for young people. I welcomed the opportunity to our present our findings to the All Parliamentary Group for Sport today, as well as discuss how some of the insight can help safeguard its future. The ASA is keen to work with Government to ensure this vital national curriculum subject is delivered to a high standard”.

Andy Reed, chair of the Sport and Recreation Alliance, said: “Being able to swim is a basic skill like running, catching and jumping – one of the core building blocks for a lifetime of activity. “If half of our seven- to 11-year-olds can’t swim, they are going to be cut off from a whole range of other activities from sailing, canoeing and rowing to water skiing, scuba diving and surfing. We need to start changing our approach to swimming and we welcome the political will we’ve seen today to try and put this into action.”

In response to the findings, APPG for Sport member Charlotte Leslie MP has tabled an early day motion, rallying MPs and Peers to sign up and get behind the cause. The motion is calling for closer OFSTED monitoring to ensure that primary schools provide more evidence and show greater commitment to their swimming programmes. The opportunity for the recently announced £150 million of ring-fenced spending for primary school sport to be used to improve these attainment levels will also be emphasised.

Charlotte Leslie MP said: “As a youngster I spent hours ploughing up and down the pool in my bid to become an Olympic swimmer. Although I never made it to the Olympics, swimming has played a key role in making me who I am.
“For many young people schools will offer the first opportunity to learn to swim, and it’s vital that Head Teachers get the support and information they need to deliver this important life skill.”
Read the: Early Day Motion #160

MAIB Safety Bulletin 2/2013 – Arniston

The MAIB has published a Safety Bulletin following the carbon monoxide poisoning on board the Bayliner 285 motor cruiser Arniston in Windermere, Cumbria on 1 April 2013, resulting in two fatalities.

Marine MAIB Safety Bulletin 2/2013 – Arniston
Incident date: 01 April 2013
Category: Leisure
Summary: Carbon monoxide poisoning on board the Bayliner 285 motor cruiser Arniston on Windermere, Cumbria resulting in two fatalities. Issued May 2013

A bank holiday weekend on board an 11 year old Bayliner 285 motor cruiser ended tragically when a mother and her 10 year old daughter died. Initial findings indicate the deceased were poisoned by carbon monoxide. A “suitcase” type portable petrol-driven generator had been installed in the motor cruiser’s engine bay to supply the boat with 240v power. The generator had been fitted with an improvised exhaust and silencer system which had become detached from both the generator and the outlet on the vessel’s side. As a result, the generator’s exhaust fumes filled the engine bay and spread through gaps in an internal bulkhead into the aft cabin where the mother and daughter were asleep.

When the owner of the boat awoke in the boat’s forward cabin, he was suffering from carbon monoxide poisoning but was able to raise the alarm. The mother and daughter could not be revived. The boat’s carbon monoxide sensor system did not alarm because it was not connected to a power supply.

SAFETY ISSUES
1. Portable air-cooled petrol generators are readily available and inexpensive, but they are usually intended for use in the open air. The use or permanent installation of these engines on boats, particularly in enclosed spaces or below decks, increases the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning.
2. It is essential that engine exhaust systems are fitted and maintained to direct poisonous fumes outside the vessel clear of ventilation intakes and accommodation spaces. Work on these systems should therefore only be undertaken by suitably qualified marine service engineers using approved parts and following the equipment manufacturer’s instructions for marine installations.
3. Carbon monoxide is a lethal gas, which has no smell, no taste, is colourless and is extremely difficult for human senses to detect. All boaters need to be vigilant and recognise the signs of carbon monoxide poisoning, which can include: headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, tiredness, confusion, stomach pain and shortage of breath.
4. Carbon monoxide is a silent killer that is just as lethal afloat as it is ashore. The correct positioning and the regular testing of any carbon monoxide sensors, whether powered by a boat’s electrical supply or self-contained, is essential. Carbon monoxide sensor alarms that do not work correctly should be replaced. When selecting a carbon monoxide alarm preference should be given to those marked as meeting safety standard EN 50291-2:2010 which are intended for use in a marine environment.

Further advice on how to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning on boats and more detail about carbon monoxide alarms, produced by the Boat Safety Scheme (BSS) and the Council of Gas Detection and Environmental Monitoring (CoGDEM), can be found at: http://www.boatsafetyscheme.org/stay-safe/carbon-monoxide-(co)
Download report: SB2_13.pdf (3,034.93 kb)